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Preserving

Understanding

Ragin'

Coastal erosion is wiping out Isle de Jean Charles. But, the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw tribe of Native Americans who live there will remain together.

The “climate refugees” are preparing for an historic relocation.

Preserving

Understanding

Ragin'

Memories and traditions of a self-sufficient culture on Isle de Jean Charles will survive.

Assistant professor Dr. Heather Stone is recording and cataloguing customs and stories to help tribal members retain their identity.

Preserving

Understanding

Ragin'

Isle de Jean Charles residents plan to resettle in a new community, thanks to an almost $50 million federally funded project.

The relocation will be the first in the lower 48 states for a community displaced by environmental factors.

February 21st, 2018

Women’s leadership conference to focus on personal, workplace goals

Professional and personal development for women will be the focus of an upcoming conference at the University of... Read More ➝
February 20th, 2018

Notary prep course again yields a record; 63 percent pass state exam

A record number of students who prepared for the state notary examination at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette... Read More ➝
February 16th, 2018

Travel website lauds University's role as region's cultural steward

A travel website ranked Lafayette among “America’s Most Artistic Towns” – and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette... Read More ➝