Tactical Navigation

Preserving

Understanding

Ragin'

Coastal erosion is wiping out Isle de Jean Charles. But, the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw tribe of Native Americans who live there will remain together.

The “climate refugees” are preparing for an historic relocation.

Preserving

Understanding

Ragin'

Memories and traditions of a self-sufficient culture on Isle de Jean Charles will survive.

Assistant professor Dr. Heather Stone is recording and cataloguing customs and stories to help tribal members retain their identity.

Preserving

Understanding

Ragin'

Isle de Jean Charles residents plan to resettle in a new community, thanks to an almost $50 million federally funded project.

The relocation will be the first in the lower 48 states for a community displaced by environmental factors.

August 9th, 2018

All aboard: Pilot transit program links University to area communities

This fall, University of Louisiana at Lafayette students who commute to and from four Acadiana communities can let... Read More ➝
August 8th, 2018

‘Underwater:’ Student podcast chronicles historic 2016 floods

History students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette have created a podcast series that delves into historic... Read More ➝
August 8th, 2018

Princeton Review guidebook rates University among nation’s ‘Best’

The Princeton Review has placed the University of Louisiana at Lafayette among the top 15 percent of the nation’s four... Read More ➝
August 22nd, 2018

Educators Night

The museum invites educators to spend a fun and relaxing evening at the museum. Learn about current and upcoming... Read More ➝
August 22nd, 2018

Creative Conversations: Live Music with Caribbean Brass

The Hilliard Museum kicks off our Fall Creative Conversations with a performance by musician Ray Theaux, and a video... Read More ➝
August 22nd, 2018

Live Music with Caribbean Brass

The Hilliard Museum kicks off our Fall Creative Conversations with a performance by musician Ray Theaux, and a video... Read More ➝

Ragin' Cajun Cam